University of Massachusetts Amherst

Search Google Appliance

Links

News

A research team led by Qiangfei Xia of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has just published a paper in the prestigious journal Nature Nanotechnology about research into a promising building block for the next generation of nonvolatile random access memory and bio-inspired computing systems. The research team says that its working memristor crossbar arrays are “to the best of our knowledge, the first high-density electronic circuits with individually addressable components scaled down to two-nanometer dimension built with foundry-compatible fabrication technologies.”

Guangyu Xu of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department is part of a team of scientists based at UMass Amherst that has been awarded a four-year, $953,300 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop miniature, implantable hardware, which can record complex brain activity in animals and analyze it in real time. See News Office release. The NSF funding is part of $16 million given to 18 cross-disciplinary projects around the country to conduct innovative research on neural and cognitive systems, thus attracting key coverage by the venerable Psychology Today.

A new paper by a research team led by Qiangfei Xia, Daniel Holcomb, and Joshua Yang of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst describes a pioneering new technique to support the safe use of all-important “digital keys” in protecting hardware security systems and producing more secure, compact, and efficient memristive hardware. The paper, titled "A provable key destruction scheme based on memristive crossbar arrays," has just been published in the prestigious peer-reviewed journal Nature Electronics.