News

The Nanoscale Computing Fabrics Lab of Professor Andras Moritz from the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department has won the Best Paper Award, for the third time in the past four years, at the IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Nanoscale Architectures (NANOARCH). The winning paper, entitled "Wave-based Multi-valued Computation Framework," was written and presented by Santosh Khasanvis, with co-authors Mostafizur Rahman, Sankara Narayanan Rajapandian, and Moritz. As ECE Department Head Christopher Hollot noted, “That’s impressive given that NANOARCH is the leading conference on novel post-CMOS nanocomputing and is a testament to the cutting-edge research that Professor Moritz’s lab conducts.”

As part of a news story for EE Times, Cheryl Brooks, director of career and student development at the College of Engineering, said more companies, both large and small, are recruiting our students. “We hosted more companies for recruiting and posted more jobs this year than last year,” says Brooks. “A wide range of companies recruited here this year, from large firms like ExxonMobil, Cisco, Pratt & Whitney, Raytheon, and Google to smaller startup companies like HubSpot and Localytics.” The story reported that students graduating this year with engineering degrees are entering a strong job market. Engineering majors historically tend to have less trouble finding jobs in their chosen field than their counterparts with liberal arts degrees. But during the recent recession, engineering schools saw larger numbers of students choosing to wait it out and go to grad school.

America has always been a nation of tinkerers, inventors, and entrepreneurs, as symbolized best by Ben Franklin and his amazing array of innovations, including bifocals, the Franklin Stove, the lightning rod, swim fins, a glass armonica, an odometer, and mapping the Gulf Stream. In true Franklinesque tradition, a growing number of Americans have recently gained access to technologies such as 3D printers, laser cutters, open-source, low-cost microcontrollers, easy-to-use design software, and desktop machine tools, democratizing the act of making and enabling citizens to build just about anything. In honor of this inventive tradition, the UMass Amherst College of Engineering would like to join in the national celebration of the so-called “Maker Movement” on June 18, when President Obama is hosting the first ever White House Maker Faire.