News

Following a school and personal record tying performance, Sean Busch, a senior in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, was named UMass Athlete of the Week on February 8. The senior helped the UMass Track and Field Team to a solid performance at the Giegengack Invitational on February 5 in Connecticut. Busch tied his personal and school record in the indoor pole vault that Saturday, reaching a height of 15-9. The mark was good enough for third place and also qualified him for the IC4A Championships. Currently Busch ranks second in the A-10 Conference in the event for 2011.

Dr. Tilman Wolf of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department is the co-author of a new book, Architecture of Network Systems, which is part of the Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Architecture and Design. Dr. Wolf’s co-author is Dimitrios Serpanos, a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Patras in Greece and the director of the Industrial Systems Institute/R.C. Athena. “This is the most comprehensive book on network systems, covering design and evaluation techniques from the link layer to application layer,” commented Laxmi Narayan Bhuyan, the distinguished professor and chair at the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, Riverside.

In 1987, after Randy Pritzker had earned his B.S. degree from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, he took a radical sidestep in his career by deciding to go to the Boston College Law School. That juke in his education proved to be a game breaker and led to his remarkable 21-year career as one of Massachusetts’ “Super Lawyers” at the Wolf Greenfield law firm, one of the world’s leading legal specialists in intellectual property, or IP.

Anyone on dialysis knows the ravages of uncontrolled anemia: severe fatigue, hospitalization, and, in extreme cases, death. Now a team from the University of Massachusetts Amherst is collaborating with a leading kidney specialist at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Mass., to design more effective protocols for dosing a key drug used for controlling anemia in dialysis patients. In dialysis patients the amount of the hormone erythropoietin, or EPO, produced by kidneys to manage the production of red blood cells and control anemia is significantly lower than in healthy persons, resulting in the diminished red blood cell production that characterizes anemia.

Professor Wayne Burleson of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department has received official word from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, or IEEE, that he will be elevated to the status of Fellow “for contributions to integrated circuit design and signal processing.” As the IEEE announcement letter said, “Recognizing the achievements of its members is an important part of the mission of the IEEE. Each year, following a rigorous evaluation procedure, the IEEE Fellow Committee recommends a select group of recipients for one of the association’s most prestigious honors, elevation to IEEE Fellow.”

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the world’s largest professional organization for the advancement of technology, has elevated Professor Dennis Goeckel of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department to the honorary position of Fellow, effective on January 1, 2011. Following a rigorous evaluation procedure, the IEEE Board of Directors announced Dr. Goeckel’s recognition with the following citation: “for contributions to wireless communication systems and networks.

Imagine being blindfolded and then turned loose, on your own, to navigate a large, strange building that you’ve never entered before. It would be like one of those sadistic, mean-spirited reality TV shows. Yet that’s precisely the predicament encountered by many of the 161 million people worldwide who suffer from vision impairment. Now an electronic system called PERCEPT, being developed by Professor Aura Ganz of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, will allow visually impaired individuals, each equipped only with a three-ounce electronic device and Bluetooth headphone, to navigate unfamiliar buildings with ease.

Electrical and Computer Engineering Department doctoral candidate Pritish Narayanan, a student of ECE Professor C. Andras Moritz (pictured), has received the Best Student Paper Award at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) International Symposium on Defect and Fault Tolerance in VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) Systems, held in Kyoto, Japan, from October 6 to 8. The title of the paper was “Parameter Variability in Nanoscale Fabrics: Bottom-Up Integrated Exploration,” and its co-authors include Dr. Moritz and ECE graduate students Michael Leuchtenburg, Prachi Joshi, and Pavan Panchapakeshan.

Raytheon recently signed an agreement with the University of Massachusetts Amherst to make Raytheon’s Principles of Systems Engineering (PoSE) course part of the College of Engineering curriculum. More than 5,200 Raytheon employees have completed PoSE, but this exciting partnership between two respected Massachusetts organizations marks the first time that PoSE has been taught for college credit to non-Raytheon graduate students and undergraduate seniors. The course, which began September 7 and has 29 enrolled students, is taught by David McLaughlin, professor of electrical and computer engineering and interim associate dean.

The College of Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst held its first annual Outstanding Alumni Awards Luncheon during Homecoming Weekend, on Saturday, October 16, 2010. The luncheon included the presentation of College of Engineering Outstanding Junior/Senior Alumni Awards to individuals who, through exemplary accomplishments, epitomize the potential of an education at the UMass Amherst College of Engineering. The event happened from 12:00 p.m. until 2:00 p.m. in the 10th floor Amherst Room of the UMass Amherst Campus Center.