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Google Talks: Chess master Gary Kasparov, “Deep Thinking”


[ssba] Former world chess champion Garry Kasparov at his office in Midtown, Manhattan, on June 13, 2016. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Gary Kasparov, perhaps the greatest chess player of all time, famously lost to IBM’s Deep Blue in 1997. In Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins, he tells his side of the story. More importantly, he writes about how artificial intelligence is about to irrevocably change the universe.

“To become good at anything you have to know how to apply basic principles. To become great at it, you have to know when to violate those principles.”
— Gary Kasparov, Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins

“The machines have finally come for the white collared, the college graduates, the decision makers. And it’s about time.”

— Gary Kasparov, Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins

“The human mind isn’t a computer; it cannot progress in an orderly fashion down a list of candidate moves and rank them by a score down to the hundredth of a pawn the way a chess machine does. Even the most disciplined human mind wanders in the heat of competition. This is both a weakness and a strength of human cognition. Sometimes these undisciplined wanderings only weaken your analysis. Other times they lead to inspiration, to beautiful or paradoxical moves that were not on your initial list of candidates.”
— Gary Kasparov, Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins


Arafat Kazi

Things I love: tech convergence, the singularity, cats.



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