The University of Massachusetts Amherst
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An article from Inside UMass reports that Assistant Professor Jun Yao of the Electrical and Computer Department has received a five-year, $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop nanoscale sensors which can measure both the mechanical and electrical properties of a cell at the same time. The grant is from NSF’s influential Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) program.

Yao says his research can lead to more precise biomedical devices for disease modeling, drug screening, and health diagnostics. Because the cell is a basic functional...

A paper in Advanced Materials Technologies, published by a team from the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department, reviews the current state of six of the most promising technologies for creating new types of memory devices that can replicate the function of biological neurons and synapses. The paper was also reviewed in The Next Platform...

University of Massachusetts Associate Professor Joseph Bardin of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department is working with Google to create a cryogenic quantum controller that operates in extreme cold and consumes less than 2 milliwatts of power — 1,000 times less than Google’s current control electronics. As an article in VentureBeat explains, “Google says it has made significant...

Four College of Engineering researchers have tied the college record for obtaining the most CAREER Awards from the National Science Foundation (NSF) in one year. Juan Jiménez, Stephen Nonnenmann, and Yubing Sun of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department and Jun Yao of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department have all received grants from the prestigious NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program.

Acting College of Engineering Dean Christopher Hollot says that “These CAREER Awards clearly reflect well on the individual promise of Doctors Jiménez...

A wave of media coverage is only the latest accomplishment in an amazing two years of productivity for research collaborators Qiangfei Xia and Joshua Yang of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department. Media stories by Science & Technology Research News and other outlets topped off a 2018 campaign in which the two ECE professors published eight pioneering articles in major Nature research journals, following a...

Qiangfei Xia and Joshua Yang of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department lead a 17-person research team that has published a paper titled "Long short-term memory networks in memristor crossbar arrays" in Nature Machine Intelligence, a new Nature research journal launching in January of 2019 and covering a wide range of topics in machine learning, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Some accepted papers are being posted online in early December. This Nature Machine...

The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image of an ant, as demonstrated for a high-school outreach program, has inspired Assistant Professor Jun Yao of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst to develop bioinspired, ultrasensitive pressure and strain sensors using microparticles resembling the bristles or tactile hairs ubiquitous in insects. “My hope was that the extremely enlarged image of an ant, perhaps a bit scary and monster-like, would excite the students’ interest in the ordinarily invisible nanoscale domain,” says Yao. Much...

A research team led by Qiangfei Xia of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has just published a paper in the prestigious journal Nature Nanotechnology about research into a promising building block for the next generation of nonvolatile random access memory and bio-inspired computing systems. The research team says that its working memristor crossbar arrays are “to the best of our knowledge, the first high-density electronic circuits with individually addressable components scaled down to two-nanometer dimension built...

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